Taking an Idea Beyond the Barricades: Sometimes the best thing we can do is ask for help and be open to criticism

Sometimes we trip ourselves up. No matter how innovative we are or how hard we work on our writing projects we leave the door open to the worst of housemates – self-doubt – and it lives rent free. Sometimes the best thing we can do is ask for help and be open to criticism.

You need to trust your writing process to help you improve.Then comes the question: who to ask?

A Couple of Suggestions

Bang2Write

JerichoWriters

A trusted friend or a professional advisor who won’t hold back from presenting you with writing support that helps you find the truth. Whether you pay for this or you’re lucky to have someone who can simply respond to your script with a rare focus, it is important to let the truth sit hard. Sometimes the best thing we can do is ask for help and be open to criticism.

My New Project

Are you wondering what I’ve been working on that has made me want to talk about this? Well, I’ve been beavering away on a brand new project, a middle grade children’s book. Like many writers trying out a new format for the first time, it’s not always easy. I’ve had wonderful advice and writing support along the way but then just as soon as you finish the first draft, which for me is always at least three drafts in, you realise this is the first time you’ve written anything for children. How on earth can you be sure it is doing what you hoped it would.

Ta Da!

So I’m feeling really positive because my call for help was answered – and in spades. Yes there was some positive feedback but the reality is I need to rewrite. It’s not all bad but it demonstrates how, in this instance, I really needed some great advice. My idea is strong and most of the characters too, but the nagging doubt I had has been confirmed: something is missing and if I am to succeed I must find it and add it into the mix.

So that’s why it has been so important to try and find the most appropriate, honest and relevant advice and make sure that finding a writing process to help you improve is not being hampered by ego.

A successful, professional writer

I will.

I can’t wait.

Thank you for your honesty and I know you are waiting to read the next draft. I won’t let you down.

Sometimes the best thing we can do is ask for help and be open to criticism.

When Is An Idea Ready?

What am I dealing with?

Sometimes, an idea for a new piece of writing comes easily. It is not always the case.

More often than not, ideas can take years to work their way through the rounds of denial, rejection and simple unfathomable doubt.

I started out writing for the theatre and to me it always seemed straightforward to say I am writing a play. Now I’m not so sure because it could be a book or a film or even a play for the radio. Of course now it could be a podcast, a game or a web series.

Continue reading “When Is An Idea Ready?”

So this is how I write…

I tend to be on the move a lot. It’s critical for me to access really good wi-fi. A cafe, such as Fika in Hastings is perfect for writing, great coffee and a reasonably quiet space to work. But it doesn’t have to be as quiet as an exam room or public library, especially if my writing is re-writing. I do like a bit of hub-hub and sometimes music. I like listening to classical or jazz but occasionally, that’s not right for what I’m working on. So, I will listen to the Clash, the Jam or PJ Harvey or a new band from Brighton called grasshopper. Or perhaps I will seek the company of someone like, Emily Barker, whose music has a really cinematic quality, which is obvious when you think why the theme for the BBC version of Wallander is so loved.

The Blank Page

Ah, yes, the blank page.

This is sometimes the easiest and sometimes the hardest place to be starting. If you’ve literally not got anything to work with, should you be looking at this page? You could, as I do, start a process of speed writing, or think of a character you’ve not met before and start there. It becomes easier, as you accumulate some notes and some images. What do I really want to write about? Who do I want to write for?

Even better is to be already looking at an outline or the beginning of a draft. You’re hungry to let the story flow. And then you stop. If you’re like me, that could be for years. If I’m writing to commission, no chance – I will find a way. I had to pitch the idea and sell it to someone else, so there’s no way I’m going to waste that opportunity. But if it’s an idea that I was so excited about, however, when I started (possibly too early) I did not find a way to get to the heart of why I needed to write it in the first place. Like many other writers I will put it away, and wait. I’ve recently revived a few ideas and conquered my original doubts or found that elusive ‘heart’.

The First Draft

The first draft is critical for me. If I can get there, no matter how rushed, then I have something to hold on to. The reason, those ideas I’ve still got safely stowed in my bottom drawer, remain there, is that I cannot get to that point. If I want to avoid that blank page and make my writing flow and not feel constrained. I write with an outline. I prefer to focus on a story that feels fresh. Which, of course, I am – just working within a framework that will get me using the strongest possible narrative shape.

The Trick

I think I’ve taken longer than most to work this out. Writing is re-writing. This means working on the first draft and producing multiple drafts to achieve my best writing. I know what I need to do to create a satisfying work of fiction or theatre. And in the case of film, a blueprint for a director and production team to follow. My viewpoint is the main focus of the next few drafts. Only then will I open it up to trusted readers – or if I’m under commission, start work on it with the producer. Press on, Write it, then craft it. Craft it again, and again. Writing is re-writing.

Be a collaborator

I love writing for theatre because of the opportunity to collaborate with a team. Film follows the same principle, though commercial film can often feel alienating for a writer. As a screenwriter for hire you’re part of a team. Just not driving the project in the same way a playwright does in the theatre. The ultimate collaboration, though, is the one I can have with readers of my fiction. The act of reading is a creative one. All readers bring their imaginations to help construct the world within a work of fiction. Reading is good for you, I think, because it exercises your imagination. Sometimes, it takes effort to work with a writer, because of your language, characters, themes or style. So if you’re a regular reader of fiction, thank you for reading!

Inside Fika, Kings Road, Hastings.https://www.facebook.com/fikacoffee44/

Stay With Me takes you from the macabre to the fantastic, highlighting the incremental changes in disparate lives. Each character navigates changing worlds, circumstances and memories. Compelling, strange and heartfelt, Stay With Me brings together the best of a darkly humorous mind.

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Stay With Me takes you from the macabre to the fantastic, highlighting the incremental changes in disparate lives. Each character navigates changing worlds, circumstances and memories. Compelling, strange and heartfelt, Stay With Me brings together the best of a darkly humorous mind.